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Moody skies 'rain' PJs

U.S. Air Force Airmen from the 38th Rescue Squadron take a selfie prior to boarding an HC-130J Combat King II for high-altitude, low-opening jumps, Aug. 18, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The jump was conducted to re-familiarize aircrew and pararescue members with processes for dropping from a high altitude which ensures world wide capabilities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)

U.S. Air Force Airmen from the 38th Rescue Squadron take a selfie prior to boarding an HC-130J Combat King II for high-altitude, low-opening jumps, Aug. 18, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The jump was conducted to re-familiarize aircrew and pararescue members with processes for dropping from a high altitude which ensures world wide capabilities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)

U.S. Air Force Senior Master Sgt. Louis Distelzweig, 347th Operations Support Squadron pararescueman, prepares for a high-altitude, low-opening jump, Aug. 18, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. This was Distelzweig’s final jump before retiring after 28 years of service as a pararescueman. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)

U.S. Air Force Senior Master Sgt. Louis Distelzweig, 347th Operations Support Squadron pararescueman, prepares for a high-altitude, low-opening jump, Aug. 18, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. This was Distelzweig’s final jump before retiring after 28 years of service as a pararescueman. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Christopher Bright, 71st Rescue Squadron loadmaster, breathes oxygen through a regulator and mask in the back of an HC-130J Combat King II, Aug. 18, 2016, in the skies over Moody Air Force Base, Ga. During operations at high altitudes, crew members are required to breathe 100 percent pure oxygen to combat the lowered oxygen levels present. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Christopher Bright, 71st Rescue Squadron loadmaster, breathes oxygen through a regulator and mask in the back of an HC-130J Combat King II, Aug. 18, 2016, in the skies over Moody Air Force Base, Ga. During operations at high altitudes, crew members are required to breathe 100 percent pure oxygen to combat the lowered oxygen levels present. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)

In the back of an HC-130J Combat King II, an altimeter displays nearly 23,000 feet while a solid-red light indicates to jumpers that they are not over the landing zone, Aug. 18, 2016, in the skies over Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Training jumps are typically conducted from 9,000 to 12,000 feet, but current deployed operations require an airdrop of 20,000 feet or more. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)

In the back of an HC-130J Combat King II, an altimeter displays nearly 23,000 feet while a solid-red light indicates to jumpers that they are not over the landing zone, Aug. 18, 2016, in the skies over Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Training jumps are typically conducted from 9,000 to 12,000 feet, but current deployed operations require an airdrop of 20,000 feet or more. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)

Pararescuemen jump from an HC-130J Combat King II at 25,000 feet, Aug. 18, 2016, in the skies over Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Pararescuemen are qualified experts in Airbourne and Military Free Fall operations, to include high-altitude, low opening techniques. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)

Pararescuemen jump from an HC-130J Combat King II at 25,000 feet, Aug. 18, 2016, in the skies over Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Pararescuemen are qualified experts in Airbourne and Military Free Fall operations, to include high-altitude, low opening techniques. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)

Pararescuemen from the 38th Rescue Squadron drift through the sky during a high-altitude, low-opening jump, Aug. 18, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Training jumps are typically conducted from 9,000 to 12,000 feet, but current deployed operations require an airdrop of 20,000 feet or more. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider)

Pararescuemen from the 38th Rescue Squadron drift through the sky during a high-altitude, low-opening jump, Aug. 18, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Training jumps are typically conducted from 9,000 to 12,000 feet, but current deployed operations require an airdrop of 20,000 feet or more. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider)

A Pararescuman from the 38th Rescue Squadron floats to the ground during a high-altitude, low-opening jump, Aug. 18, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. After jumping from an altitude of nearly 25,000 feet, the Airmen fell for approximately three minutes before opening their parachutes for this training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider)

A Pararescuman from the 38th Rescue Squadron floats to the ground during a high-altitude, low-opening jump, Aug. 18, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. After jumping from an altitude of nearly 25,000 feet, the Airmen fell for approximately three minutes before opening their parachutes for this training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider)

Pararescuemen from the 38th Rescue Squadron glide toward the landing zone during a high-altitude, low-opening jump, Aug. 18, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The Airmen jumped from one of Moody’s HC-130J Combat King IIs for training purposes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider)

Pararescuemen from the 38th Rescue Squadron glide toward the landing zone during a high-altitude, low-opening jump, Aug. 18, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The Airmen jumped from one of Moody’s HC-130J Combat King IIs for training purposes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider)

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Christian Egger, 347th Rescue Group pararescueman, collects his parachute after landing from a high-altitude, low-opening jump, Aug. 18, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. During operations at high altitudes, crewmembers are required to breathe 100 percent pure oxygen to combat the lowered oxygen levels present. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider)

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Christian Egger, 347th Rescue Group pararescueman, collects his parachute after landing from a high-altitude, low-opening jump, Aug. 18, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. During operations at high altitudes, crewmembers are required to breathe 100 percent pure oxygen to combat the lowered oxygen levels present. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider)

U.S. Air Force Senior Master Sgt. Kenneth Marshall, 38th Rescue Squadron pararescueman, carries his parachute after landing from a high-altitude, low-opening jump, Aug. 18, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The jump was conducted to re-familiarize aircrew and pararescue members with procedures for dropping from a high altitude and to ensure proficiency. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider)
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U.S. Air Force Senior Master Sgt. Kenneth Marshall, 38th Rescue Squadron pararescueman, carries his parachute after landing from a high-altitude, low-opening jump, Aug. 18, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The jump was conducted to re-familiarize aircrew and pararescue members with procedures for dropping from a high altitude and to ensure proficiency. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider)