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23d AMXS bathes the hawg

A U.S. Air Force Airman from the 23d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron washes an A-10C Thunderbolt II, June 16, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Maintenance procedures require that the A-10s are washed at least every 180 days. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Daniel Snider/Released)

A U.S. Air Force Airman from the 23d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron washes an A-10C Thunderbolt II, June 16, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Maintenance procedures require that the A-10s are washed at least every 180 days. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Daniel Snider/Released)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Zachary Moore, 23d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron avionics technician, laughs while pulling his hood up during an A-10C Thunderbolt II wash, June 16, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. A wash team commonly consists of the aircraft’s crew chiefs, a weapons technician and an avionics technician. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Daniel Snider/Released)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Zachary Moore, 23d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron avionics technician, laughs while pulling his hood up during an A-10C Thunderbolt II wash, June 16, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. A wash team commonly consists of the aircraft’s crew chiefs, a weapons technician and an avionics technician. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Daniel Snider/Released)

Aircraft washing materials rest on a wet floor during an A-10C Thunderbolt II wash, June 16, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Strong chemicals are used to clean the aircraft in order to eat away the residue weapons systems leave behind. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Daniel Snider/Released)

Aircraft washing materials rest on a wet floor during an A-10C Thunderbolt II wash, June 16, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Strong chemicals are used to clean the aircraft in order to eat away the residue weapons systems leave behind. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Daniel Snider/Released)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Alan Oseguera, 23d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron weapons technician, rinses the wing of an A-10C Thunderbolt II, June 16, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Washing an A-10 can take anywhere between four and eight hours depending on how many Airmen are involved. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Daniel Snider/Released)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Alan Oseguera, 23d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron weapons technician, rinses the wing of an A-10C Thunderbolt II, June 16, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Washing an A-10 can take anywhere between four and eight hours depending on how many Airmen are involved. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Daniel Snider/Released)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Zachary Moore, 23d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Avionics Technician, dons personal protective equipment during an A-10C Thunderbolt II wash, June 16, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Hazardous material suits are required due to the chemicals used to clean the aircraft.(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Daniel Snider/Released)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Zachary Moore, 23d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Avionics Technician, dons personal protective equipment during an A-10C Thunderbolt II wash, June 16, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Hazardous material suits are required due to the chemicals used to clean the aircraft.(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Daniel Snider/Released)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Brandon Vandyke, 23d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, scrubs the side of an A-10C Thunderbolt II, June 16, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Airmen begin the wash process by covering every hole of the aircraft to avoid water damage to valuable equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Daniel Snider/Released)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Brandon Vandyke, 23d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, scrubs the side of an A-10C Thunderbolt II, June 16, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Airmen begin the wash process by covering every hole of the aircraft to avoid water damage to valuable equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Daniel Snider/Released)