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Tyndall ops squadron maintains info superiority to deliver air dominance

U.S. Air Force Airmen from the 325th Operations Support Squadron intelligence flight examine a map during an unclassified briefing at Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla., Oct. 25, 2017. The 325th OSS intel flight works behind the scenes analyzing and assessing information then disseminating the pertinent information to allow for better decision making. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaiah J. Soliz/Released)

U.S. Air Force Airmen from the 325th Operations Support Squadron intelligence flight examine a map during an unclassified briefing at Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla., Oct. 25, 2017. The 325th OSS intel flight works behind the scenes analyzing and assessing information then disseminating the pertinent information to allow for better decision making. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaiah J. Soliz/Released)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Jake Cravens, 325th Operations Support Squadron intel operations analyst, briefs fellow analysts during an unclassified briefing at Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla., Oct. 25, 2017. Intel operations analysts are charged with being the eyes and ears of the Air Force. They receive, analyze, and turn raw data into intelligence that can then be used for a variety of purposes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaiah J. Soliz/Released)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Jake Cravens, 325th Operations Support Squadron intel operations analyst, briefs fellow analysts during an unclassified briefing at Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla., Oct. 25, 2017. Intel operations analysts are charged with being the eyes and ears of the Air Force. They receive, analyze, and turn raw data into intelligence that can then be used for a variety of purposes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaiah J. Soliz/Released)

An F-22 Raptor model is shown on a map during an unclassified 325th Operations Support Squadron intelligence briefing at Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla., Oct. 25, 2017. The 325th OSS Intel flight works behind the scenes analyzing and assessing information then disseminating the pertinent information to allow for better decision making. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaiah J. Soliz/Released)

An F-22 Raptor model is shown on a map during an unclassified 325th Operations Support Squadron intelligence briefing at Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla., Oct. 25, 2017. The 325th OSS Intel flight works behind the scenes analyzing and assessing information then disseminating the pertinent information to allow for better decision making. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaiah J. Soliz/Released)

TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. --

The ability of pilots to deliver air dominance from the advanced cockpit of their F-22 Raptors is aided by the efforts of those working behind locked doors, usually in some of the most secure buildings on an installation, where they provide essential information to warfighters.

The men and women from the 325th Operations Support Squadron (OSS) intelligence flight work behind the scenes analyzing and assessing information and then disseminating the pertinent material to decision makers.

“We essentially study other nations and potential threats where we are operating that could affect our F-22 pilots or the United States military as a whole and provide that data to the pilots or the commanders so that they can make correct decisions,” said Airman 1st Class Jake Cravens, 325th OSS intel operations analyst.

According to the intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance factsheet, analysts are charged with being the eyes and ears of the Air Force. They receive, analyze and turn raw data into intelligence that can then be used for a variety of purposes. Intelligence Airmen are key to keeping America’s leaders ahead of its adversaries by providing real-time information that allows commanders and pilots an advantage in decision-making.

“It’s important they know what they are flying into when they head into an operation,” Cravens said. “If they go help ground forces, they need to know what is going on in the environment and what could potentially be a threat to them.”

According to Air University, intelligence is much more than a support function; superior knowledge directly enhances air power.

With readiness and current operations high on the list of Air Combat Command lines of effort, intelligence Airmen provide direct support in maintaining national security and keeping Airmen safe. Effective combat air power is made possible when commanders have access to intelligence products that are accurate, relevant and timely.

Tyndall’s 325th OSS intel flight will continue to provide mission critical information thus enabling leaders to maintain the air dominance that the F-22 Raptor brings to America’s warfighting capability.