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New upgrade provides internet hot spots for 4th LRS, ensures better work efficiency

Airman 1st Class Brandon Ferguson, 4th Logistics Readiness Squadron driver, scans a part for delivery April 27, 2017, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina.. Every day, an average of 1,300 lbs. of parts are delivered across base. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kenneth Boyton)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Brandon Ferguson, 4th Logistics Readiness Squadron driver, scans a part for delivery April 27, 2017, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C. Every day, an average of 1,300 pounds of parts are delivered across base. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kenneth Boyton)

Senior Airman Kevin Miranda, 4th Component Maintenance Squadron aircraft fuel systems journeyman (left), signs for parts April 27, 2017, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Airman 1st Class Brandon Ferguson, 4th Logistics Readiness Squadron driver (right), delivers an average of 200 parts per day across base. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kenneth Boyton)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Kevin Miranda (left), 4th Component Maintenance Squadron aircraft fuel systems journeyman, signs for parts delivered by Airman 1st Class Brandon Ferguson (right), 4th Logistics Readiness Squadron driver, April 27, 2017, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C. Ferguson delivers an average of 200 parts per day across base. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kenneth Boyton)

SEYMOUR JOHNSON AIR FORCE BASE, N.C. --

Thanks to an upcoming upgrade, the 4th Logistics Readiness Squadron Cargo Movement Team will be able to deliver hundreds of packages across the base more easily and efficiently, keeping to their tight schedule.

“During our four-day testing period, the hot spot we used gave us service at all of the locations and greatly increased our productivity,” said Capt. Sande Penuliar, 4th LRS deployment distribution flight commander. “By the end of the fiscal year, CMT is planning on having four, or hopefully five, internet hot spots.”

A single driver and hot spot saved the CRT an average of two hours per day during the trial period. After being fully implemented, the hot spots are estimated to save over 2,000 hours a year. But, man hours aren’t the only thing affected by the current issue.

At each stop, the drivers use a tablet to scan the packages and record the signature. The tablet needs an internet connection to verify the delivery, and while most of the base has Wi-Fi, the tablets can’t always connect. This, in turn, complicates the deliveries.

“When there’s no internet available, the drivers have to either wait for a connection or fill out a receipt by hand, which normally adds 10 to 15 minutes per incident,” said Staff Sgt. Micah Butler, 4th LRS vehicle operator. “If the program doesn’t have enough of a connection, it will accept the delivery and later on will realize it didn’t go through.”

According to Staff Sgt. Elisha Bryant, 4th LRS operator records and licensing manager, the issue doesn’t just affect LRS but can affect the base and its mission as a whole.

“If our driver needs to go back to the site to have them reaccept the delivery, it cuts into our time as well as theirs,” Bryant said. “The Airman, who signed for the parts previously, now has to step away from what they were doing to track down every part which was received and ensure they are signing for the correct items.”

Going back to the site wastes gas and puts more wear and tear on the vehicles, Bryant added.

“After seeing hot spots being used successfully when I was deployed, I knew they could fix the problem here,” Bryant said. “They’ll help us complete our mission faster and help the rest of the base complete its mission.”