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4th LRS improves personnel readiness process at SJAFB

Members of the 4th Logistics Readiness Squadron created and will be implementing a process expected to decrease discrepancies and time spent on checklists when preparing to deploy. The process is expected to have a five percent decrease in discrepancies every six months. (U.S. Air Force illustration by Airman Miranda A. Loera)

Members from the 4th Logistics Readiness Squadron recently created a process expected to decrease discrepancies and time spent on checklists when preparing to deploy they will soon implement. The process is expected to have a five percent decrease in discrepancies every six months. (U.S. Air Force illustration by Airman Miranda A. Loera)

SEYMOUR JOHNSON AIR FORCE BASE, N.C. --

Members from the 4th Logistics Readiness Squadron recently created a process expected to decrease discrepancies and time spent on checklists when preparing to deploy they will soon implement.

The percentage of installation personnel readiness discrepancies reported for the 4th Fighter Wing steadily increased over the last year, exceeding 10 percent for more than two-thirds of the reported period, according to 1st Lt. Kevin Jones, 4th LRS installation deployment officer

“Our set improvement target for every six month period is to reduce the discrepancy rate by 5 percent until a goal of 0 percent is reached,” Jones said.

Deployers must go through a series of briefings in order to finish off their checklist, such as legal and financial briefs. After the briefs, they must get issued gas masks and weapons and have those cleared.

“Anything missing or not completed on a deployer’s checklist is considered a discrepancy,” Jones said. “If the discrepancy is not fixed before deployment, then it becomes an area of responsibility discrepancy once the member is at the deployed location.

“It was important to us to hear our customers’ concerns and implement changes to meet their needs,” Jones added.

The current pre-deployment process requires members to physically go to multiple agencies to receive briefings and complete their checklists.

“Initially, we mapped out the process of pre-deployment and decided which items we could eliminate,” said Stefan Bowlsby, 4th Force Support Squadron management analyst, who aided Jones in the overhaul. “Ultimately, we were able to streamline 19 tasks and save each deployer an average of nine hours.”

The new and improved process is projected to eliminate most discrepancies and save approximately 10,000 hours per year by consolidating all mandatory pre-deployment briefings, according to Jones. Some of the streamlined tasks included electronic signatures for equipment ordering and utilizing unit deployment manager meetings for training.

“Anytime we can save deploying members’ time it’s worth it, and I’m very happy we created these new processes,” Jones said.