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23rd CES trains in extinguishing night fires

Firefighters from the 23d Civil Engineer Squadron douse flames during nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. All of Moody’s firefighters are required to perform this training at least once a year. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider)

Firefighters from the 23rd Civil Engineer Squadron douse flames during nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. All of Moody’s firefighters are required to perform this training at least once a year. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider)

Staff Sgt. Joshua Humes, 23d Civil Engineer Squadron fire protection crew chief, kneels during nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Approximately 15 firefighters participated in this live fire training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider)

Staff Sgt. Joshua Humes, 23rd Civil Engineer Squadron fire protection crew chief, kneels during nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Approximately 15 firefighters participated in this live fire training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider)

Firefighters from the 23d Civil Engineer Squadron team up to extinguish flames during nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The prop aircraft fires were propane-controlled by the fire department’s assistant chief of training, Charlie Johnson. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider)

Firefighters from the 23rd Civil Engineer Squadron team up to extinguish flames during nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The prop aircraft fires were propane-controlled by the fire department’s assistant chief of training, Charlie Johnson. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider)

A P-23 Airport Rescue Fire Fighting vehicle drenches a prop aircraft during nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The P-23 ARFF is capable of carrying up to 3,300 gallons of water, 500 gallons of fire-retardant foam and 500lbs of dry powder for extinguishing fires. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider)

A P-23 Airport Rescue Fire Fighting vehicle drenches a prop aircraft during nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The P-23 ARFF is capable of carrying up to 3,300 gallons of water, 500 gallons of fire-retardant foam and 500 pounds of dry powder for extinguishing fires. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider)

Firefighters from the 23d Civil Engineer Squadron begin to congregate after completing nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. It’s required by the Federal Aviation Administration that every airfield have a firefighting team on standby in case of an aircraft incident. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider)

Firefighters from the 23rd Civil Engineer Squadron begin to congregate after completing nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. It’s required by the Federal Aviation Administration that every airfield have a firefighting team on standby in case of an aircraft incident. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider)

A firefighter enters a prop aircraft during nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. After extinguishing external fires, firefighters entered the prop aircraft to continue combating the flames inside. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider)

A firefighter enters a prop aircraft during nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. After extinguishing external fires, firefighters entered the prop aircraft to continue combating the flames inside. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider)

Firefighters from the 23d Civil Engineer Squadron signal for a radio check prior to advancing on a fire during nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. This training is an annual requirement for Moody firefighters and is just one of the ways they stay ready to protect people, property and the environment from fires and disasters. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)

Firefighters from the 23rd Civil Engineer Squadron signal for a radio check prior to advancing on a fire during nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. This training is an annual requirement for Moody firefighters and is just one of the ways they stay ready to protect people, property and the environment from fires and disasters. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)

Airman 1st Class Jacob Molden, 23d Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, looks towards a burning prop aircraft during nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. This training is an annual requirement for Moody firefighters and is just one of the ways they stay ready to protect people, property and the environment from fires and disasters. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)

Airman 1st Class Jacob Molden, 23rd Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, looks towards a burning prop aircraft during nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. This training is an annual requirement for Moody firefighters and is just one of the ways they stay ready to protect people, property and the environment from fires and disasters. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)

Firefighters from the 23d Civil Engineer Squadron douse a prop aircraft during nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. This training is an annual requirement for Moody firefighters and is just one of the ways they stay ready to protect people, property and the environment from fires and disasters. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)

Firefighters from the 23rd Civil Engineer Squadron douse a prop aircraft during nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. This training is an annual requirement for Moody firefighters and is just one of the ways they stay ready to protect people, property and the environment from fires and disasters. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)

Firefighters from the 23d Civil Engineer Squadron extinguish a flame during nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. This training is an annual requirement for Moody firefighters and is just one of the ways they stay ready to protect people, property and the environment from fires and disasters. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)
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Firefighters from the 23rd Civil Engineer Squadron extinguish a flame during nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. This training is an annual requirement for Moody firefighters and is just one of the ways they stay ready to protect people, property and the environment from fires and disasters. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)

Firefighters from the 23d Civil Engineer Squadron advance towards a fire during nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. This training is an annual requirement for Moody firefighters and is just one of the ways they stay ready to protect people, property and the environment from fires and disasters. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)
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Firefighters from the 23rd Civil Engineer Squadron advance towards a fire during nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. This training is an annual requirement for Moody firefighters and is just one of the ways they stay ready to protect people, property and the environment from fires and disasters. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)

Matthew Perreira, right, 23d Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, backs up a fellow firefighter during nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. This training is an annual requirement for Moody firefighters and is just one of the ways they stay ready to protect people, property and the environment from fires and disasters. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)
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Matthew Perreira (right), 23rd Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, backs up a fellow firefighter during nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. This training is an annual requirement for Moody firefighters and is just one of the ways they stay ready to protect people, property and the environment from fires and disasters. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)

Firefighters from the 23d Civil Engineer Squadron use a P-23 Airport Rescue Fire Fighting vehicle during nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The P-23 is primarily used to respond to aircraft fuel fires using its 3,300 gallons of water, 500 gallons of fire-retardant foam and 500lbs of dry powder. There are 250 P-23s in the Air Force inventory across active duty, Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve bases. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)
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Firefighters from the 23rd Civil Engineer Squadron use a P-23 Airport Rescue Fire Fighting vehicle during nighttime, live-fire training, Jan. 10, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The P-23 is primarily used to respond to aircraft fuel fires using its 3,300 gallons of water, 500 gallons of fire-retardant foam and 500 pounds of dry powder. There are 250 P-23s in the Air Force inventory across active duty, Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve bases. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)

MOODY AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. --

Team Moody’s 23rd Civil Engineer Squadron firefighters performed nighttime, live-fire training Jan. 10 here to prepare for the possibility of aircraft fire operations during the night.

“This is 80 percent of what we do; the other 20 percent is structural,” said Charlie Johnson, 23rd CES assistant fire chief of training. “Most likely if anything is ever to happen, it will be with an aircraft. So, it’s very important we get this live-fire training.”

It isn’t only important that the 23rd CES Airmen experience this type of training, but it’s required by the Air Force and the Federal Aviation Administration for all airport firefighters to conduct this training periodically.

“Situations like this happen,” said Airman 1st Class Jacob Molden, 23rd CES firefighter. “In the real world, we’re not going to be able to really predict everything. So, it’s good in training to throw out some random events and not tell us exactly how it’s going to go to let us figure it out on our own, because that’s how we learn.”

Upon arriving to the scene, firefighters used their vehicles to assess the situation and began battling the flames.

“Usually we modulate,” Molden said. “So, we’ll [drive] around the aircraft and spray water, and then we’ll position ourselves and pull hand-lines to fight the fire.”

After pulling the hand-lines, Airmen began to group up and combat the fire.

“My favorite part is actually fighting the fire,” Molden said. “It’s hot and adrenaline’s going with all the lights, people yelling, and it’s chaotic. At the same time, we’ve got it all figured out, because our training is very good. We know exactly what to do. We can fall back on our training to get the job done.”

While Molden said he enjoys this training, he has no doubts about the seriousness of it and hopes the newer guys take something away.

“When a live fire burns, you’re not exactly sure how you’re going to act,” Molden said. “You get to know yourself a little bit better and what works for you and also what you can work on to get better.