CBRNE prepares Airmen to deploy

  • Published
  • By Airman Eugene Oliver
  • 23rd Wing Public Affairs

Team Moody Airmen participated in a chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense (CBRNE) class, Feb. 1, here.

The class was geared towards better preparing the Airmen to combat an enemy attack while also familiarizing them with their mission-oriented protective posture (MOPP) gear.

“We need our Airmen to be prepared for any type of attack the enemy could throw at them,” said Tech Sgt. Anna Olson, 23d Civil Engineer Squadron NCO in charge of Emergency Management, Plans, Education and Training. “The skillsets we’re teaching are vital, and we aspire for the Airmen to take what we teach them and educate others to potentially save lives.”

All Airmen who deploy are required to participate in the CBRNE class so they are prepared for the hazards they could face while downrange such as nerve and blister agents.

“If someone deploys to a higher threat environment, they may be faced with multiple CBRNE threats that can damage you physically and mentally so we need to make sure our Airmen are ready to combat them,” said Olson. “We cover many principles of CBRNE, but we mostly focus on the ability to survive and operate during a crisis.”

While familiarization with the various chemical threats while in a deployed environment is vital, Olson says being knowledgeable and comfortable with MOPP gear is just as important.

“Participating in a training like this really helped me feel more aware and appreciative to the capabilities of my MOPP gear,” said Staff Sgt. Christopher Windley, 23d Force Support Squadron fitness specialist. “Ensuring all of the functions on my gas masks are working properly could be the difference between life and death.”

The gas mask is one of the main components of MOPP gear, but Olson said being comfortable and knowledgeable with all of the segments of the gear is just as important.

“Our instructors make sure that the students understand how to wear all of the gear properly because that’s their first line of defense against a chemical attack.” said Olson. “A lot of hazards can travel in the air and making sure that our students understand how important it is to keep their gear sealed is key to their survival.”

Olson said, keeping Airmen aware and knowledgeable of how to use their MOPP gear properly holds even more importance given the current times.

“Things can change at a moment’s notice, so the last thing we want to do is fall behind and not be prepared for that moment when our Airmen our called to fight,” said Olson. “We want Airmen to understand that you might be going through the class now, but to hold onto the information your learning, because at any time you may be called to use it.”

 

 

 

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CBRNE prepares Airmen to deploy

  • Published
  • By Airman Eugene Oliver
  • 23rd Wing Public Affairs

Team Moody Airmen participated in a chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense (CBRNE) class, Feb. 1, here.

The class was geared towards better preparing the Airmen to combat an enemy attack while also familiarizing them with their mission-oriented protective posture (MOPP) gear.

“We need our Airmen to be prepared for any type of attack the enemy could throw at them,” said Tech Sgt. Anna Olson, 23d Civil Engineer Squadron NCO in charge of Emergency Management, Plans, Education and Training. “The skillsets we’re teaching are vital, and we aspire for the Airmen to take what we teach them and educate others to potentially save lives.”

All Airmen who deploy are required to participate in the CBRNE class so they are prepared for the hazards they could face while downrange such as nerve and blister agents.

“If someone deploys to a higher threat environment, they may be faced with multiple CBRNE threats that can damage you physically and mentally so we need to make sure our Airmen are ready to combat them,” said Olson. “We cover many principles of CBRNE, but we mostly focus on the ability to survive and operate during a crisis.”

While familiarization with the various chemical threats while in a deployed environment is vital, Olson says being knowledgeable and comfortable with MOPP gear is just as important.

“Participating in a training like this really helped me feel more aware and appreciative to the capabilities of my MOPP gear,” said Staff Sgt. Christopher Windley, 23d Force Support Squadron fitness specialist. “Ensuring all of the functions on my gas masks are working properly could be the difference between life and death.”

The gas mask is one of the main components of MOPP gear, but Olson said being comfortable and knowledgeable with all of the segments of the gear is just as important.

“Our instructors make sure that the students understand how to wear all of the gear properly because that’s their first line of defense against a chemical attack.” said Olson. “A lot of hazards can travel in the air and making sure that our students understand how important it is to keep their gear sealed is key to their survival.”

Olson said, keeping Airmen aware and knowledgeable of how to use their MOPP gear properly holds even more importance given the current times.

“Things can change at a moment’s notice, so the last thing we want to do is fall behind and not be prepared for that moment when our Airmen our called to fight,” said Olson. “We want Airmen to understand that you might be going through the class now, but to hold onto the information your learning, because at any time you may be called to use it.”