Marines 'construct' installation at Poinsett

  • Published
  • By Airman 1st Class Christopher Maldonado
  • 20th Fighter Wing Public Affairs
The Marines “deployed” to Poinsett Electronic Combat Range near Wedgefield, South Carolina, March 21-30 to evaluate the detachment’s ability to perform their jobs and accomplish mission-essential tasks in a simulated deployed environment.

The range provides a number of opportunities for Defense Department military members to train on bombing and shooting and offers over 12,500 acres for navigation, and survival, evasion, resistance and escape training.

Approximately 150 Marines mock-deployed to the range and constructed a Marine-run installation.

Marines spent the week-long training honing their skills in expeditionary airfield support, aircraft salvage and recovery, and constructing bulk fuel sites.

“Our basic requirements are tested in this training,” said Marine Sgt. Alan Largen, Marine Wing Support Detachment 31 fuels chief. “The work we do here, we must be able to do and execute flawlessly when we deploy.”

For a lot of the younger Marines, they don’t get a chance to experience an environment like this early in their careers, said Largen.

Marines had the opportunity to practice their tactics at the 20th Fighter Wing-run training ground, providing support for their Air Force counterparts.

“While we’re out here training, we get the opportunity to perform road maintenance and improvement, as well as ground clearing for the range,” said Marine Capt. James Stanley, MWSD 31 operations officer.

Using the range gave Marines the opportunity to train on their mission essential tasks stateside prior to deployment.

 

 

 

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Marines 'construct' installation at Poinsett

  • Published
  • By Airman 1st Class Christopher Maldonado
  • 20th Fighter Wing Public Affairs
The Marines “deployed” to Poinsett Electronic Combat Range near Wedgefield, South Carolina, March 21-30 to evaluate the detachment’s ability to perform their jobs and accomplish mission-essential tasks in a simulated deployed environment.

The range provides a number of opportunities for Defense Department military members to train on bombing and shooting and offers over 12,500 acres for navigation, and survival, evasion, resistance and escape training.

Approximately 150 Marines mock-deployed to the range and constructed a Marine-run installation.

Marines spent the week-long training honing their skills in expeditionary airfield support, aircraft salvage and recovery, and constructing bulk fuel sites.

“Our basic requirements are tested in this training,” said Marine Sgt. Alan Largen, Marine Wing Support Detachment 31 fuels chief. “The work we do here, we must be able to do and execute flawlessly when we deploy.”

For a lot of the younger Marines, they don’t get a chance to experience an environment like this early in their careers, said Largen.

Marines had the opportunity to practice their tactics at the 20th Fighter Wing-run training ground, providing support for their Air Force counterparts.

“While we’re out here training, we get the opportunity to perform road maintenance and improvement, as well as ground clearing for the range,” said Marine Capt. James Stanley, MWSD 31 operations officer.

Using the range gave Marines the opportunity to train on their mission essential tasks stateside prior to deployment.